Under moonlight

Kathy KrugerUncategorized11 Comments

Being born in the sign of Cancer it’s probably not surprising that I love the moon.

Last night’s was an almost full one, bright and clear on a silken night canvas that stretched out above me, the star attraction amongst the stars.

The night before, as the moon was starting its bloom towards fullness, it seemed to play a game of hide and seek with the clouds, which seemed to float through the sky quite fast so that it looked like the moon was trying to outrun them.

It will be completely full on Monday night, St Patricks day, and the Irish will be celebrating and the leprechauns dancing a jig with the loon on the moon.

My heritage is Irish, so I’ll probably look like a crazy with my jig on under a big full moon.

I love watching the moon when it is full, and looking for it when it is just a sliver of a crescent.

I love looking up at the moon sometimes and realising it is the same moon that my children’s birthparents look up at – that we are all the same under a bright blessed sky.

I love the idea of a new moon each month, of making a new start. I love the fact that the moon is there, even when we can’t see it.

Sun and moon

I loved watching the moon in a northern hemisphere sky the year we lived in Canada (2011). There was a super moon that heralded the start of Spring in the northern hemisphere – the moon came closer to the earth than it had been since 1993, only we missed the spectacle under a thick soup of cloud that hung low and claustrophobic on the landscape much of the time we lived there. But when the snowy mountains around us were revealed, they were something special.Mountain - the view from the top is just different from the view from the bottom (1024x768) (2)

Whistler fire station view

I love the perspective of the night sky – a whole other world, with us so insignificant below just listening to the insects, the quiet creaks of the house and the lull of a tranquil street.

I love the stillness of the night and the darkness that makes room for dreams (not so fussed on the thoughts, more numerous than the stars, that pop into my head at 2am).

I love sleep on a cool, comfortable night, when I can get it, long and deep and undisturbed until I wake with the birds.

I love the day turning into night and the night turning into day, the comfort of the cycle and the reassurance of tomorrow.

I love the sunshine today – heading out to spend some time soaking it in. Linking up for a Sunshine Sunday with Zanni.sunshinesundays-150x150

Cheers

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Kathy KrugerUnder moonlight

11 Comments on “Under moonlight”

  1. Lisa@RandomActsOfZen

    I also find it somehow comforting to think that we all share the same moon, Kathy.
    For some reason, I have always slept extremely well at full moon. I told this to Bell when she was really little, and now she always reminds me when the moon is full, saying that she sleeps better too.
    Happy St. Pat’s Day xx

  2. Zanni Arnot

    I am cancer too, and I love the moon, so there you go! I love your line: “It’s good for the soul to feel so insignificant.” It’s true. Sometimes for my daughter’s sake I go outside with her to see the moon and the stars. I love how overwhelmed and in awe she is by their greatness. Thanks so much for linking up for sunshine sundays. Lovely post! x

    1. Kathy Kruger

      Hey Zanni – I think we discovered we actually share the same birthday (11 July) – although you’re much younger than me. Glad your daughter is discovering star and moon gazing.

  3. Renee

    What is the deal with Cancerians and the moon? My daughter is a Cancerian and she is obssessed with it. We too were watching it the other night play hide and seek with the clouds. We will be sure to have a look at the full moon tonight and may even do a jig of our own 🙂

  4. Lydia C. Lee

    Funny you say it’s good to feel insignificant. We go to the Observatory a lot, mainly because I love looking at the planets up close, but the stuff we learn sends me on an existential trip, which highlights our insignificance, and can put troubling thoughts into perspective…

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